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Opinion/Commentary

Early childhood educators call police on parent over LGBTQ+ curriculum complaint

Pencil and blocks on desk in childcare centre
Image: iStock

An early childhood centre has clashed with a parent over teaching LGBTQ+ topics.

According to Daily Telegraph, an anonymous parent claimed a staff member at Roseville Kids Care, Sydney, contacted police after the parent complained about ‘gender ideology’ being taught at the centre.

The issue the parent allegedly had was children as young as five learning ‘radical gender theory’. Children were learning about terms such as: non – binary, pansexual, lesbian and asexual. Children also coloured in Pride flags.

The parent said:

I visited it and was shocked that there was a giant out-size ‘pride’ flag. It was the biggest flag in the room, far bigger than the Australian flag. When I went in there was an entire wall describing different sexualities giving definitions of things like ‘pansexual’ and ‘lesbian’.

A number of photos taken by other parents show pride flags that were coloured by the children.

Should educators teach children about LGBTQ+ topics?

The actions from Roseville Kids Care has received support and criticism

Sydney psychologist, Clare Rowe said that LGBTQ+ concepts were too adult for young children to grasp.

…they simply do not have the mental faculties to process layered, complex information.

Rowe put the onus of teaching about gender and sexuality on the parents.

Director of Foundations of Western Civilisation Program for Institute of Public Affairs, Dr. Bella d’Abrera has condemned the centre.

Parents should be extremely concerned that they are entrusting their very young children to an after care centre which is indoctrinating them with radical gender theory.

However, Roseville Kids Care does have some supporters. CEO of the Network of Community Activities, Pauline Kane argued:

It’s about raising children with inclusive attitudes.

Kane claimed primary – aged children often raised questions about topics such as transgenderism. Those questions should be answered.

Is five too young to learn about LGBTQ+ topics?

I can see both sides. Yes, young children need to be protected from adult concepts they can’t grasp. Ideally, parents and caregivers should be able to approach topics like gender and sexuality in a way that’s age appropriate.

I don’t agree with young children getting involved in Pride culture. I didn’t like what some children have allegedly been exposed to in Pride parades this year.

While I don’t totally disagree with it, I don’t see why young children have to know what the Pride flags are. I’m happy with five- year – olds to know that; sometimes two women love each other like mummy and daddy do. Same with men, etc.

Likewise, when a child is being raised by same – sex or gender non – conforming parents, then bring it up. Children should be able to know that families are different.

Children should be able to explore their identity, including gender. Before anyone hits the roof, many children have a concept of their gender from a very young age.

So I’m in the middle. Little children don’t need to be exposed to Pride culture. However, it’s not a bad thing to teach children that it’s OK to express their gender the way they see fit. And some men love men and some women love women. Pride? That can wait until they’re older.

What do you think? Should young children learn about Pride and LGBTQ identities? Let me know your thoughts below.

Categories
Opinion/Commentary

New South Wales and Victoria’s premiers promise free pre – K

Children eating at a table in childcare
Image: Pexels

In two Australian States, early childhood education could get a shake up.

The Premiers of New South Wales and Victoria are promising free Pre – K for four – year – old children. It will take place five days a week.

Victoria’s Premier, Daniel Andrews plans to implement the change by 2025. However, NSW Premier, Dominic Perrotet won’t implement the change until 2030.

In a joint statement, the premiers said:

It will mean that, in the next 10 years, every child in Victoria and NSW will experience the benefits of of a full year of play-based learning before the first year of school.

The premiers also claim that free Pre – K will not only benefit children, but also working parents.

Pre – K will take place in preschools in both states.

NSW Minister for Education and Early Learning, Sarah Mitchell said the policy was… “the right thing to do for our kids”.

Australian children need better in education

According to Sydney Morning Herald, Australian children aren’t doing well in education.

Australia ranks 32 out of 38 OECD countries in child well – being. Australia ranks 39 out of 41 European Union (EU) and OECD in education outcomes.

Standards in literacy, numeracy and science have been declining over the past decade.

Early childhood education is shown to improve education outcomes. Children can experience these benefits across their schooling.

Education psychologist, Claire Rowe expressed concerns to Andrew Bolt about making Pre-K compulsory.

However, she did point out one positive. Children who come from dysfunctional families will be able to find security and attachment with early childhood educators.

Children who live in poverty will benefit greatly from free Pre – K.

The economic burden early childhood education had on parents

One reason why there’s a push to make Pre – K free is to release the burden from parents. Too often, the cost of early childhood education cancels out any financial benefit of working.

So offering some relief to parents makes sense.

Will it be compulsory?

According to the ABC, neither premier is planning to make Pre – K compulsory. Of course that can change in the future. Frankly, I doubt it ever will be.

Good start, but more needs to be done

I think this announcement is a vote grab for next year’s state elections. Having said that, I don’t have anything against free Pre – K. If it helps children and unburdens parents, then great.

However, I think there are bigger issues facing early childhood centres nationwide. Like children left hungry or given poor quality food in early childhood education centres.

So, let’s get the standards of quality early childhood education up again. Make sure that all early childhood education centres are properly staffed.

The governments need to make sure all early childhood education centres have the resources – including funding for food – that they need.

Let’s not have early childhood educators buried in endless paperwork. Just allow them to nurture and educate the children. And, of course, they need to be paid properly.

What are your thoughts on free Pre -K? Good idea? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below.